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apron dress patterns - when you don't know what to do... — LiveJournal
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tashabear
tashabear
apron dress patterns
http://sca.uwaterloo.ca/mjc/sca/aprond.html -- interesting; seems like a lot of fabric

http://www.earlyperiod.com/articles/viking_apron/ -- I like this one, too.

Perhaps scale models in fabric instead of paper are in order? I need Barbies/dolls wif bewbs to model them on! Maybe I should trot off to the Salvation Army shop...

In other news, my throat hurts. Pity me.

EDIT: in retrospect, I think that the second of the two patterns is a little skimpy, and so I'll concentrate my efforts on the first. It's esy enough to take flare out of the skirt by making the gores narrower or eliminating a couple altogether.

i feel: sick sick

4 trips or shoot the rapids
Comments
cellio From: cellio Date: February 2nd, 2004 09:42 am (UTC) (base camp)
The first one doesn't actually use that much fabric, assuming you have a wide piece. Under 2 yards. Basically, the piece needs to be as long as your chest measurement plus allowances for three seams. Or, if you're orienting it the other way (i.e. your chest + seams fits the width of the fabric), it needs to be as long as two times waist to hem plus waist to neck (plus allowances).

With the second one, I would be concerned about the triangular pieces just a bit. With one side of a gore cut on the bias and one not, things might hang a little funny. That's why the first one makes half-pieces for the one gore -- the vertical part of each gore is straight along the weft (or warp, if you're orienting the fabric the other way). You can address that in this pattern by taking the rectangle, cutting a triangle out of the center with two half-triangles on the sides, and then sewing the half-triangles together to make a gore. (I don't think I can draw thst in a way that will come through HTMLification...)
tashabear From: tashabear Date: February 2nd, 2004 10:12 am (UTC) (base camp)

Re:

Well, it might need to be a leetle bigger; I have a 50" bust measurement. But what I was really wondering was where the seams went. I guess the body piece with the center seam goes in the back... and that puts the two complete pieces joining in front? Or does it matter? I guess it wouldn't matter, but that's why I wanted to make a small mock-up, before making a full-size muslin, since there was a great cutting layout but no sewing layout.
cellio From: cellio Date: February 2nd, 2004 10:25 am (UTC) (base camp)

Re:

Well, it might need to be a leetle bigger; I have a 50" bust measurement.

Ah. So a 54"-wide piece of fabric might just work if you're tight with the seams. (This is assuming no loss to shrinkage, of course.) Or 60" would definitely work even if there's significant shrinkage. But you won't be able to cut it from 45" fabric as laid out here. (Even if you oriented it the other way, that would make a very short skirt.)

But what I was really wondering was where the seams went.

I usually put a full piece centered in front, and the piece with the seam in the middle ends up on one of the sides. The seam ends up closer to the back than to the front, so I don't consider it an aesthetic flaw. Your aesthetics may differ. :-) (And similarly, the gore with the seam is the one in the back.)

I guess it wouldn't matter, but that's why I wanted to make a small mock-up, before making a full-size muslin, since there was a great cutting layout but no sewing layout.

Mock-ups are always a good idea if you're uncertain of how something works.

The first diagram was meant to be the sewing diagram. Make a tube, alternating big pieces and gores. (This would be clearer if the line didn't break, I suppose, and it's hard to show the tube-ness, i.e. sewing the ends together.) Once you have a tube, it's easier to determine strap placement by just putting it on and pinning/marking.
tashabear From: tashabear Date: February 2nd, 2004 11:18 am (UTC) (base camp)

Re:

Once you have a tube, it's easier to determine strap placement by just putting it on and pinning/marking.


Yeah, that's how I did the ones on my sarafan, which is cut almost exactly like the other one I posted about, except the two big panels meet under the armpit and there are gores on the sides, starting at the hip. The straps come from the center back over the shoulder and are sewn at about where my bra straps join the cups. Or thereabouts; it depends on where it looks good.
4 trips or shoot the rapids